Introducing HIF Graduate Scholar Boglárka Bozsogi

Boglárka Bozsogi is pursuing a Masters of Science from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Boglárka has received an HIF scholarship to assist her in completing the program.

Boglárka Bozsogi

Boglárka graduated from Corvinus University Budapest in 2016, where she studied International Relations. She mainly focused on international politics and security, international relations theory, and diplomatic history. She also completed a one-year graduate program of Security Studies and received a Masters degree from the University of Birmingham, UK in December 2017.  Her dissertation research focused on the role of interpersonal trust in negotiations and conflict resolution, under the guidance of Professor Nicholas J. Wheeler.

In Budapest, Boglárka worked at the U.S. Embassy as an intern at the Political and Economic Section, where she corresponded with diplomatic corporations, composed policy briefs, and organized roundtable conferences for members of the government, NGO representatives, civil society and business leaders.

“The Embassy was a milestone for my professional development where I gained a first-hand experience of the complexities of diplomacy, and met very important people to me who helped me along the way, up to the United States.”

Boglárka is thankful to continue her international experience at Georgetown University, where the program’s core values encourage students to make a life-long commitment to both leading and serving the greater global community.

“Georgetown is an invaluable experience—not only for learning and growing, but for the people who make this journey complete. As a Fulbright scholar, my primary interest is the role of think tanks in introducing expertise, insights, and innovative policy solutions into the foreign policy and decision-making processes.”

Boglárka plans her prospective ‘special project’ to show how think tanks, NGOs, and independent research institutes factor in the strategy formulation process and bring transformative policy ideas into practice, and how to introduce this U.S. practice to the Hungarian political culture.

Looking towards the future, Boglárka hopes to work for the external relations office of a think tank, serving the foreign policy community with knowledge, analysis, and perspective. To that end, she is currently interning at the Hudson Institute in the office of Walter Russell Mead, where she provides fact-checking and background research on foreign policy, security and defense issues for Professor Mead’s publications in the Wall Street Journal. Her long-term goal is to work in multilateral diplomacy and conflict resolution.

She is happy to be in a international affairs program that lets her grown in these areas. At Georgetown, she currently focuses on Middle East security and mediation. She hopes to help bring intractable conflicts to an end through trust building in mediated negotiations. In her free time Boglárka is a jazz dancer and a dedicated reader of The Economist.

“To me, being a Hungarian in the United States is about bringing perspective into the discussion, and listening to differing voices to open horizons. Washington D.C. is an exceptional city, and there is no better place to study foreign policy. I am forever grateful for this time.”