Introducing 2017 Coalition Internship Program Participant Luca Mórocz

Luca Mórocz from Budapest, Hungary arrived to Washington this spring and will spend 4 months at the Global Entrepreneurship Network. With HIF’s support, the Hungarian American Coalition’s Internship Program will be hosting seven interns in 2017 to provide first-hand experience at various Washington-based institutions. Internship participants are also expected to complete a Coalition research project that enables them to become familiar with the Hungarian-American community. 

Luca’s host institution, the Global Entrepreneurship Network (GEN), is a year-round platform of programs and initiatives aimed at creating one global entrepreneurial ecosystem. GEN helps people in 160 countries unleash their ideas and turn them into promising new ventures—creating jobs, accelerating innovation and strengthening economic stability around the world. GEN’s headquarters is in 1776, a co-working space in Washington, which is a real hub for startups. 

Pursuing an internship at GEN really changed my perspective as I can experience how this organization or several startups operate without the old-school, hierarchic system. 

Before starting her internship in Washington DC, Luca worked for an international consulting company called M27 Absolvo for one year. Her main task at the company was market research in European markets focused on Germany and the CEE region. 

Luca is pursuing undergraduate studies in International Economics at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics (Budapest, Hungary), where she is specializing in Economic Statistics and Corporate Finance. She is interested in foreign economic policy and politics, and was a member of the organizing committee of Budapest International Model United Nations (BIMUN) between 2011 and 2015.

Luca and István Dobozi, former lead economist at the World Bank

Apart from her internship at GEN, Luca is working on a research project focusing on President Trump’s economic and trade policy and its possible outcomes, especially its impact on the EU and Hungary. 

Through assignments to think tanks and non-government organizations, CIP participants learn about the workings of both the U.S. government and the non-profit world. Their experience helps them establish contacts in the U.S. in their chosen field, and motivates them to enter public service in their country of origin.